Categories: News

by Johannes Ziegler

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Categories: News

by Johannes Ziegler

February 28, 2024

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As the PHOENIX project delves into the field of self-healing batteries, the implementation of triggering mechanisms becomes a crucial point to consider. Once sensors measure that the cell overcomes a certain level of State-of-Health, the initiation of self-healing mechanisms becomes imperative. The project aims to explore and develop three distinct triggering mechanisms, each of which is finely tuned to specific self-healing processes and customised responses to particular cellular degradation scenarios.

Let’s take a look at these three mechanisms:

1. Thermal Trigger

The thermal trigger mechanism revolves around the use of self-healing polymers that require temperatures ranging from 60 °C to 80 °C for optimal functionality. To ensure precision in heating only the specific functional layer, the elements will be strategically placed within the cell at local points. Temperature-trigger components will be realised through the application of printed resistor materials with self-regulating properties, preventing the temperature from exceeding the defined maximum.

2. Magnetic Triggering

The magnetic triggering mechanism involves the development of an integrated magnetic field generator designed to provide a magnetic flux of approximately 100mT. This integration will utilise folded insulated planar coils to generate the necessary magnetic field. Magnetic particles embedded within the self-healing polymer will be activated, dissipating heat locally to initiate the self-healing process or inducing a lateral movement to mend cracks.

3. Pressure-Activated Component

Another triggering component operates through the application of pressure. For pressure generation, the project explores the use of minimised HASEL (Hydraulically Amplified Self-Healing Electrostatics) actuators. These actuators are tested to provide controlled pressure onto the battery cell, especially those that are clamped or pre-strained. HASEL actuators leverage incompressible dielectric fluids, manipulated by Maxwell stress, to induce pressure and trigger the necessary self-healing responses.

By delving into these innovative triggering mechanisms, PHOENIX aims to push the boundaries of battery technology, paving the way for resilient and self-sustaining energy solutions. The careful adaptation of each mechanism to specific self-healing processes underscores the project’s commitment to addressing diverse cell degradation challenges with precision and effectiveness.

Image credits: Photo by Spencer on Unsplash

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